Meanderings of a Minister


Be Strong in the Lord

The Easter celebrations are over.  The family has returned home or you have returned home.  You have been back at work for a week.  The decisions you made to be more faithful have been tried.  How do you keep the momentum going and maintain the growth that has started in your heart and in your walk with Christ?

While a different setting, David dealt with similar issues when he wrote Psalm 27:

The Lord is my light and my salvation; Whom shall I fear? The Lord is the defense of my life; Whom shall I dread? When evildoers came upon me to devour my flesh, My adversaries and my enemies, they stumbled and fell. Though a host encamp against me, My heart will not fear; Though war arise against me, In spite of this I shall be confident. One thing I have asked from the Lord, that I shall seek: That I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, To behold the beauty of the Lord And to meditate in His temple. For in the day of trouble He will conceal me in His tabernacle; In the secret place of His tent He will hide me; He will lift me up on a rock. And now my head will be lifted up above my enemies around me, And I will offer in His tent sacrifices with shouts of joy; I will sing, yes, I will sing praises to the Lord. Hear, O Lord, when I cry with my voice, And be gracious to me and answer me. When You said, “Seek My face,” my heart said to You, “Your face, O Lord, I shall seek.” Do not hide Your face from me, Do not turn Your servant away in anger; You have been my help; Do not abandon me nor forsake me, O God of my salvation! For my father and my mother have forsaken me, But the Lord will take me up. Teach me Your way, O Lord, And lead me in a level path Because of my foes. Do not deliver me over to the desire of my adversaries, For false witnesses have risen against me, And such as breathe out violence. I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord In the land of the living. Wait for the Lord; Be strong and let your heart take courage; Yes, wait for the Lord.

First, David believed that he did not need to fear anyone or anything that opposed him because he believed God to be more powerful than his enemies.  God is more powerful than the enemy within and the enemies without.  He did not let the fear of failure, loss, or even war cause him to fear to the point that he took his eyes off of God.  We must not allow our fears and failures to take our eyes off of God either.

Second, David continued to hold the Lord and worship before his eyes throughout his life.  He was constantly reminded that, even if his enemies would prevail, he would spend eternity in the house of the Lord in Heaven.  If his enemies did not prevail, David would dedicate himself to worshiping at the Tabernacle.  We need to have this confidence as well.  If you have repented of your sins and surrendered your life to following Christ for the rest of your life, then heaven is your ultimate destination.  Until then, nothing can separate us from Him and from the privilege of worshiping Him.

David hungered to learn from God.  He wanted to know God.  He wanted to understand God’s character so that he could become more and more aware of and convinced of God’s love for him.  You and I have a privilege that David did not have.  We have the whole Bible to read and study and use to understand God and His plan for our lives.  In order to keep the momentum going with the decisions we made during the Lenten season and Easter, we must make the study of and obedience to God’s word a constant priority.

Lastly, David was honest with his frustrations as he went along.  He said that he was concerned to the point that he would have despaired if he did not believe that he would see the goodness of God in the land of the living.  David said he was really close to despair, but he was reminded that, even when he was not faithful, God still is.  You and I have that promise as well.  Jesus is coming again to get His children.  When things are hard here, we must keep this future deliverance in mind.  We must let that encourage us not to give up, give in, or give out.



Who Is This Jesus We Celebrate at Easter?
April 13, 2017, 9:02 am
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

In Genesis…He is the Creator and the Seed of Woman that would overcome the Serpent

In Exodus…He is our Passover Lamb

In Leviticus…He is our High Priest, the Sacrifice for our sins, and our Cleanliness before God

In Numbers…He is the Cloud by day, the Fire by night, and the One High and Lifted Up

In Deuteronomy…He is the One True Prophet

In Joshua…He is the Captain of the Lord’s Army

In Judges…He is the Lawmaker, Judge and Jury

In Ruth…He is our Kinsman Redeemer

In 1 and 2 Samuel…He is the Prophet of the Lord

In 1 and Kings…He is our only King

In 1 and 2 Chronicles…He is the Source of Righteous Decisions and a Cleansing from Wrong

In Ezra…He is our Inerrant Scribe

In Nehemiah…He is the Repairer of Broken Down Walls and Lives

In Esther…He is our Advocate and Deliverer

In Job…He is our Dayspring and Living Redeemer

In Psalm…He is our Shepherd and our Song

In Proverbs…He is Wisdom Personified

In Ecclesiastes…He is the Goal of All Pursuit for Meaning

In the Song of Solomon…He is the Shepherd-Lover of our Souls

In Isaiah…He is the Coming Messiah and the Prince of Peace

In Jeremiah…He is the Righteous Branch

In Lamentations…He is the Weeping Prophet and the God of Faithfulness and Truth

In Ezekiel…He is the Son of Man and the Wheel within a Wheel

In Daniel…He is the Striking Stone and the Fourth Man in the Furnace

In Hosea…He is the Husband and Healer of the Backslider

In Joel…He is the Baptizer in the Holy Spirit

In Amos…He is the Heavenly Husbandman and Burden Bearer

In Obadiah…He is Our Savior

In Jonah…He is the Resurrection and the One Who Forgives

In Micah…He is the Messenger with Beautiful Feet

In Nahum…He is the Avenger of God’ elect, the Stronghold in the Day of Trouble

In Habakkuk…He is the Great Evangelist, and the God of Our Salvation

In Zephaniah…He is the One Who Restores the Lost Heritage

In Haggai…He is the Desire of All Nations and the Cleansing Fountain

In Zechariah…He is the Fountain of Life and the Son Who Was Pierced for us

In Malachi…He is the Sun of Righteousness rising with healing in His wings

In Matthew…He is the promised Messiah

In Mark…He is the Wonder-working Servant

In Luke…He is the Son of Man

In John…He is the Word Made Flesh and God the Son

In Acts…He is the Ascended Lord, Voice from the Heavens and the Source of the Church

In Romans…He is the One Who Justifies

In 1 and 2 Corinthians…He is our Sufficient Lord

In Galatians…He is the One Who Brings Liberty from Sin and the Law

In Ephesians…He is the Christ of Great Riches and our All in All

In Philippians…He is our Joy and the Meeter of All Our Needs

In Colossians…He is the Fullness of the Godhead Bodily

In 1 and 2 Thessalonians…He is our Blessed Hope and the Coming King

In 1 and 2 Timothy…He is our Mentor and Mediator

In Titus…He is our Example and Devoted Pastor

In Philemon…He is our Friend and Brother

In Hebrews…He is our High Priest That Understands

In James…He is the Great Physician and Our Pattern for Daily Living

In 1 and 2 Peter…He is the Chief Cornerstone of Our Faith

In 1, 2 and 3 John…He is Love Everlasting

In Jude…He is the Lord coming with Ten Thousands of His Saints

In Revelation…He is the Lamb that was Slain, the Triumphant King, the Bridegroom, the Lord of Lords and the Final Say

How do you respond to a Savior like that?  You surrender in worship to Him!  No wonder we shout “He is Risen!”

 



Count Your Many Blessings
March 31, 2017, 1:50 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Have you ever stopped to think about all of the blessings you have been given just by virtue of the fact that you are a believer in and follower or Jesus Christ?  Ephesians 1 lists seven of these blessings.  Perhaps in reading through the following list, we can embody Proverbs 14:30, which says, “A tranquil heart is life to the body, but envy makes the bones rot.”  Here is that list from Ephesians 1.[1]

Blessing #1:  God has chosen us to be holy and blameless.  (Ephesians 1:4)

This means that, if you are a believer in Jesus Christ, God has chosen you and drawn you into relationship with Him.  He has begun a good work in you and will complete it. (Philippians 1:6)  He is giving you the desire daily to live for Him.  (Ephesians 2:13)  God already sees you the way you are going to be when you become what He is leading you to want to become.

Blessing #2:  God has adopted us into His family.  (Ephesians 1:4-6)

This means that you are wanted by God.  He is not stuck with you.  He knew you before you were born (Psalm 139).  He wrote your name down in the book of life before you came to be.  (Revelation 13:8)(Ephesians 1:4)  He chose you.  He loves you.  You are part of His family with all of the privileges that come along with being a child of the King!

Blessing #3:  We are redeemed and forgiven.  (Ephesians 1:7-8)

This means that the ransom has been paid to deliver us when we were incapable of delivering ourselves.  He loosed us from the demands of sin.  (Romans 6:23)  He purchased us and set us free.  He cancelled our debt.  We owe nothing for our sin because He already paid for it.  When we sin, He advocates on our behalf.  (1 John 2:1)

Blessing #4:  God has shown us the mystery of His will.  (Ephesians 1:9-10)

This means that we no longer have to worry about living for or carrying out the will of God in our lives.  For most of us, we get to a fork in the road of our lives and wonder, “What is God’s will for me in this situation?”  We really don’t have to ask this because we already know the answer.  God’s will for me in every situation is to glorify Him.  To point people towards praising the grace of God.  For many of life’s situations, we needn’t stand paralyzed at the fork in the road because in Christ, we should be living out this will everyday.  Jesus showed us the example in that He lived for and glorified God in every circumstance.  (John 17:4)

Blessing #5:  We are chosen for an inheritance.  (Ephesians 1:11-12)

This means that we are chosen to receive not just heaven, although that would be enough.  We are also chosen for an inheritance of God’s love, nearness, and presence in our lives.  We are also to receive an inheritance such as is described in the promises to the overcomers in Revelation 2-3.

Blessing #6:  We are included in Christ.  (Ephesians 1:13)

This means that I am in Christ.  Inside, covered by His righteousness, identified by His Name and considered His brother and fellow heirs (Romans 8:17).  When God looks at us, He does not see the sin we so struggle with.  Instead, He sees the righteousness of His Son that is being accounted unto us by grace, through faith.

Blessing #7:  We have the guarantee of the Holy Spirit.  (Ephesians 1:13-14)

This means that I already have the down payment for what is to come.  I have the seal of God that is an indication of His promise that I am His and will be for eternity.  (1 Corinthians 12:3)

With all of these blessings, why do we chase after others that don’t even come close to measuring up?  We are encouraged by some to seek parking places close to the store, bigger cars, fancier clothes, etc.  All of these “blessings” will burn up and will be gone in an instant.  The blessings described in Ephesians 1 will never go away.

Count your blessings!

[1] Holladay, Tom.  Great Chapters of the Bible:  Ephesians Chapter One, Discover Your Spiritual Blessings.  Rancho Santa Margarita, CA: Saddleback Resources, 2010.



What Does It Mean to Be Holy?
March 22, 2017, 2:03 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A girl walks up to a group of boys at the local high school.  The boys stiffen up and straighten up as she nears.  Their raucous tones turn to hush.  As she walks by, one of the boys says, “There she is!  Who does she think she is?  She acts ‘holier than thou’.”  What would make someone look at another person and say they are holy?  What does “holy” even mean?

The Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary defines “holy” the following way:

HOLY — moral and ethical wholeness or perfection; freedom from moral evil. Holiness is one of the essential elements of God’s nature required of His people. Holiness may also be rendered “sanctification” or “godliness.” The Hebrew word for “holy” denotes that which is “sanctified” or “set apart” for divine service.[1]

So being holy means being different than everyone else around you.  Ironically, the word for “church” in Greek is ekklesia.  The direct translation means “to assemble out of or away from”.  In the New Testament, Paul refers to all believers in Jesus Christ as “saints” (see Romans 1:7, 8:7, 12:13, 15:25, 26, 15:31, 16:2, 16:15, 1 Corinthians 1:2, 6:1, 2, 14:33, 16:1, 16:15, 2 Corinthians 1:1, 8:4, 9:1, 9:12, 13:13, Ephesians 1:1, 1:15, 1:18, 2:19, 3:8, 3:18, 4:12, 5:3, 6:18, Philippians 1:1, 4:22, Colossians 1:2, 1:4, 1:12, 1:26, 1 Thessalonians 3:13, 2 Thessalonians 1:10, 1 Timothy 5:10, Philemon 5, 7)  The word saint is the noun form of the word that is translated holy.

So, the church is called out from world.  Believers are set apart and different.  By extension, then, Christians are holy.  So when you come upon someone who says that you are “holier than thou” what do they mean?  They simply mean that you are different than they are.  You are set apart by God for a special purpose and a certain affection by and through Him.  So what they are actually saying is that you are just who God called you, saved you, is transforming you, and how God already sees you to be.  You are different.

Maybe what we need in our day are not men and women who shrink back and are ashamed of being considered or called different.  Perhaps what we need are men and women who lean into the work of the Holy Spirit in their lives.  Possibly what we need are believers who will own God’s stamp of approval over their hearts and lives as badges of honor and who look for opportunities to let their lights shine before men so that they might glorify our God, Who is in heaven.  We need men and women who will live out the part of the Lord’s prayer that we pray for so easily.  “Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy Name.  They Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven.”

So the next time someone accuses you of being “holier than thou”, thank them.  Tell them that it is the work of God in your life and that He wants to do that work in them as well.  Tell them that you are not perfect yet, but you are not who you used to be either.  Tell them how they can become a follower of Jesus as well.  And then ask them if they would like to.  Who knows.  They might have started the conversation God wanted to use to save them.

[1] Youngblood, R. F., Bruce, F. F., & Harrison, R. K., Thomas Nelson Publishers (Eds.). (1995). In Nelson’s new illustrated Bible dictionary. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, Inc.



God Never Gives Up On His People
March 16, 2017, 1:53 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

I was recently reading in Exodus about Nadab and Abihu.  Now, I realize that most people must look up those names, but they are very important figures in the Old Testament.  Let me tell you about them and why they are so important.  First, they were important because they were the sons of Aaron whom God personally chose to become priests to serve before Him in the Tabernacle.  Imagine being the first priest called by God to serve.  But go further than that and imagine being called by God’s own voice! (Exodus 28:1)

Next, they were important because they were part of the seventy that had worshipped God on the mountain and had come down and had prophesied before the people and helped Moses shoulder the load of speaking to the people on God’s behalf. (Exodus 24:1)

Lastly, they were important because they decided, in spite of the instructions God had given, to offer strange fire on the altar and God killed them on the spot. (Number 3:4)

Okay, so you are thinking…” Thanks!  Now I’m depressed.  If God could do that to them, then what about me?”  I want us to learn from Nadab and Ahibu, but I want us to learn from their lives, not their deaths.  God personally called them.  Since I believe in the omniscience of God (omni=all, science=knowledge…God knows everything), then I have to believe that He knew they would fail, but HE CALLED THEM ANYWAY!  What does that mean?  What does that mean to me?

What this means to me is that, in spite of my worst failures, God will continue to give me chances.  In spite of my worst stumbling, He never gives up on reaching out to me.  No matter how little faith I have, God, the author of faith, is always there and always offering His Hands.  If I will spend more time looking up for His help and reaching out for His forgiveness, I can spend less time carrying a heavy guilt load and a bunch of shame I was not meant to carry.

Here’s the best part.  If you are a new creature in Christ, you can do the same.  If you have surrendered your life to Christ, He will never turn away.  (Romans 5:9-10) He will never put you to shame and He will in no wise cast you out.  (John 6:37) I don’t know about you, but that is great news to me.  I feel more like Paul all the time in Romans 7,

“For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. But if I do the very thing I do not want to do, I agree with the Law, confessing that the Law is good.  So now, no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh; for the willing is present in me, but the doing of the good is not. For the good that I want, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want. But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good.  For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin.”  (NASB)

Isn’t it good to know God won’t give up on you?  Why not take the time today and thank Him for just that reason?  Having thanked Him, let’s hang on and get it right so that we don’t end up like Nadab and Abihu.



Character or Characters?
March 3, 2017, 1:46 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

[ File # csp4399401, License # 1874051 ]
Licensed through http://www.canstockphoto.com in accordance with the End User License Agreement (http://www.canstockphoto.com/legal.php)
(c) Can Stock Photo Inc. / kikkerdirk

You might have been intrigued by the title for this article.  You may have thought, “What would he mean by that?”  I am glad that you wondered this or I would not have a purpose for writing the rest of this article.  We could just stop with a title.

When reading Job recently for my quiet times, I came across a verse that really struck me.  Let’s see if it registers with you.

“Have I rejoiced at the extinction of my enemy, Or exulted when evil befell him?” (Job 31:29, NASB95)

In this verse, Job was defending himself.  He had gone from having lots of wealth, comfort and ease to having no of any of those things.  His friends had joined him and, after sitting with him for a week, they began to correct him.  Their assumption, because they did not know what happened in the throne room of heaven in chapter one, was that Job had sinned and therefore he was facing difficulty.  They accused him of many serious crimes and told him that the reason he was having difficulty was that God was judging his sin.  They were wrong, but they didn’t know it, yet.

By the time we get to this chapter, Job had heard from most of his friends and although they had different ways of arguing their cases, they had all accused him of wrong and felt the need to justify God’s actions by their accusations.  Job defended himself by stepping through each of the sins most prevalent in their day and denying involvement in any of them.

I read Job’s defense and I think that I do pretty good with most of what Job is using to defend himself.  He talks about not gazing at young women and lusting after them, check.  He talks about not running after deceit as a means of gaining greatly, check.  He talks about not having an affair, check.  He talks about not cheating those who work for him, check.  He talks about not withholding help from the poor who have asked, check.  He talks about not cheating orphans, check.  He talks about not trusting in gold, getting a little nervous.  Lastly, he talks about not being inwardly and secretly pleased when my enemy goes through a difficult time, ouch!

As I read his comment, I was challenged to search my heart and ask if I have ever felt smugly about the failure of someone who has been rude or mean to me.  I wonder if I have ever secretly smiled when someone passed me on the highway and then I see them pulled over, or when a criminal is caught or goes to jail.

What he is talking about is not about following just the characters or letters that make up the word of God, but about having the character of the Word of God.  Which do I spend more time pursuing?  The characters on the page or the character of the One about Whom the pages talk?  Do I measure my Christian life by the experiences of others I read or by what God is doing in my life right now?

As I read this passage, I was made immediately aware that I needed to repent.  I have certainly and often gloated over the difficulties that my enemies have gone through.  Jesus said,

“But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.” (Luke 6:27–28, NASB95) Do I do that?  Or do I secretly think that they are getting what is coming to them?

This is a character issue.  This is what God is about changing in your life.  He wants your character to match yours.  He wants you to have a family resemblance to Him.  Do you?  Do I?  If not, will we tell Him, turn away from it, and follow Him?  Or will we attend the next study and think that is good enough?  Good question.  God question.



What English Bible Should I Read, Part 2
February 27, 2017, 1:33 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

bible

Last week, I started an article that ended up being long, but was also incomplete.  Already this week, I have been asked why I am so against the Authorized Version or the King James Version as it is more commonly known.  While I am not sure how people got that out of my previous article, in the article, we continue to look at the translations from 1881 forward in helping us to answer the title question, which English bible should we read today?

In 1870, Dr. Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Winchester, made a motion to revise the Authorized Version yet again.  This time, the committee was formed of two teams in the United States and two in England with the hope of getting them to work together.  This did not happen as the Americans did not want to use the strict guidelines of the English.  The Americans wanted to update the language to be more in line with life in America.  The result was a version that was translated from the Masoretic text as was the Authorized Version with very little changes other than clarifying words based upon advances in studies in Greek and Hebrew.  The final version was released and titled the Revised Version in 1881.  Meanwhile, the American committees released their version in 1901 and it was titled the American Standard Version.

While the Revised Version had a somewhat cool reception in England, the American Standard Version had a much warmer reception in America.  While the ASV certainly had vociferous critics, it was almost immediately adopted by the Presbyterian Church and then others.

In 1928, the copyright of the American Standard Version was acquired by the International Council of Religious Education of which were some 45 major denominations.  Due to the Great Depression, the group was unable to fund its revision until 1937 and would produce the Revised Standard Version in stages.  First, the New Testament was published in 1946.  Next came the Old Testament in 1952 and then the Apocrypha was added in 1957.  This was a version that first began to address archaic language like “thee” and “thou” and replace it with you.  They adopted the use of you when referring to the words of Jesus prior to His resurrection and then “thee” after it when Jesus spoke.  This version became one of the most popular in Canada, America, and England and was continually revised until 1971.

The Lockman Foundation of LaHabra, California, a non-profit Christian incorporation formed to promote Christian education, proposed to take advantages of advancements in English development in America and Biblical Studies as well as textual criticism to produce a more readable, but word-for-word translation.  The translation committee was formed of 58 scholars from various denominations including:  Methodist, Presbyterian, Southern Baptist, Church of Christ, Nazarene, American Baptist, Fundamentalist, Conservative Baptist, Free Methodist, Congregationalist, Disciples of Christ, Evangelical Free, Independent Baptist, Independent Mennonite, Assembly of God, North American Baptist, and others.  The Bible was finished and published in 1971.  This version also used updated language.  Overall, this version follows most closely to the original languages when compared to previous translations.

Also in 1971, Jay Green, of the Associated Publishers and Authors, produced a new version of the Bible entitled King James II Version.  Green stated, “No one ways a new Bible!  They just want the old one in a form they can read and understand and trust.”  Unlike other translations to this point, this was a translation of a translation.  This was a translation of the Authorized Version and was one of the first translations to break the text into paragraphs.  Problems have been noted with this version as the translators also attempted to change the Old Testament to more closely match its New Testament quotations, which were not always verbatim.

In 1973, The New International Version was published as a thought for thought translation instead of the traditional word for word translation.  Originally theorized in 1955, Howard Long, a layman went about looking for a version of the Bible that would apply to the average, working man, woman and child.  After ten years of searching for something devoid of the archaic language of the 1700’s, but still wanting to be faithful to the text, the National Association of Evangelicals listened and translated the New International Version.  Each book was assigned to a team of 8 to 12 scholars that were experts in the field.  Those teams brought back their versions of the book assigned and their version was scrutinized by the other scholars before being accepted and included in the final product, which was published officially in 1978.

The New King James was the next major translation released with the New Testament coming out in 1979 and the completed Bible available in 1982.  Sam Moore, then president of Thomas Nelson Corporation, one of the leading publishers in Bible sales, decided that many people preferred the translation of the King James, but wanted it to be updated, so once again, the translation of a translation was underway and produced a more readable version that carried the same translation techniques as the King James as it was translated from the KJV.  The primary difference between the two, on a grand scale, is the deletion of the Apocrypha which was originally contained in the King James 1611 and its subsequent updates.

In 1989, the New Revised Standard Version was released.  Based on the work of 30 scholars from the National Council of Churches, the goal of this version was to be “as literal as possible while being as free as necessary”.  Based upon the Biblica Hebraica Stuttgartensia and the United Bible Societies’ Greek Text (3rd edition of 1966 corrected in 1983).  While the translation committee continued some of the more unfortunate renderings of the RSV, and took some of them further, this Bible is still popular today.

From this time forward, Bible translation has exploded from the advantages of modern scholarship, archaeological discoveries, further advances in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek languages of the periods, and continued evolution of the English language in America and elsewhere.  This does even include very popular paraphrases  Some the lesser known and lesser used versions include:

New English Bible (170, Revised 1989)

Holman Christian Standard Bible (2000, currently being revised as the Christian Standard Bible)

New English Translation (NET) Bible (1998, Revised 2001) – First Online Bible as the primary format

English Standard Version (ESV)(2001) – Rapidly becoming more and more popular with those of a Reformed Theological bent and with those more conservative scholars.

While I am sure that I have missed some translations, and have completely avoided listing paraphrases like the Living Bible, the Message, Phillips’ New Testament, the Cotton Patch Gospel, and others.  This has been a very brief overview of the development of the English Bible.  The question still may remain, “Which is the best?”  The answer may depend upon the preference of your church or denomination.  It may also depend upon how you want to use that particular Bible.  Some versions are more suited for in depth study, while others are better suited for devotional usage and still others are more helpful for simply reading the Bible through.   That being said, a study of the languages from which the English Bible has been translated (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek) is still the best way to evaluate and understand the issues around Bible translation.  But the absolute best translation is to read it, believe it, and translate it into action in your life, heart, mind and body.