Meanderings of a Minister


How Is Your Phone Changing You? Part 11

I recently came across a book by Tony Reinke entitled, “12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You”.  The title intrigued me because I have suspected some of this has been going on for years.  In the book, Tony is not anti-phone, but encourages the reader to be mindful of changes that are happening in us because of our use of our cell phones.

So far, we have considered that our phones are encouraging us to become addicted to distraction, have encouraged us to ignore flesh and blood relationships that require effort and risk on our part, and that they have encouraged us to crave immediate approval.  We have also seen that our phones are changing us is that they are robbing us of literacy and causing us to feed on the produced images others want us to see as well as changing us to become what we spend time with online.  Our phones are also making more connected when alone and more alone when we are with others.  They also give us the ability to engage in secret vices with virtually no one near us knowing what we are up to.  Our phones are also encouraging us to lose the context of meaning as well as causing us to become more insecure.  These are examples of how our phones are changing us.

The next area that Reinke mentions about how our phones are changing us is probably one of the first most people would think of when it comes to this issue.  Our phones are encouraging us to become harsh with one another.  By that, he means that we are quick to shame people.  We are also quick to wade into a discussion with no interest in the actual debate at hand, but only the desire to bludgeon the sender of the message with our need for attention.  We use harsh language.  We use our words to wound and not to bind up.

I teach a class at our local community college on customer service and workplace etiquette.  In this class, we talk about the use of technology to expand the reach of the business or organization and how you interact with others reflects what the other person thinks about your company of organization.  We state it strongly by stating, if your company entrusts you with a company email, they are putting the trust in you that you will represent them well.  They entrust the future of the company with that person, customer, or vendor to you.  How you treat that person will definitely affect what they think of your company.

As Christians, we represent not just a company, not just an organization, but we represent the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords.  Our phones are encouraging us to be harsh with people.  That causes many, or reinforces the views of many, to think that Christians are harsh, brutal people who want to beat them up and shame them publicly for any sin they have ever committed.  They think that Christians care about no one but themselves and have no time for people who aren’t perfect.

When we are unnecessarily harsh with people, we close them off to any discussions with us that might lead to the change of their eternal address.  Like Jesus said of the Pharisees, “You travel the world to make a disciple, but then you make it impossible for them to come into the Kingdom.”

Instead, we ought to, “Do unto others what we would have them to do us.”  We should, “Love your neighbor as yourself.”  When we are harsh with people, we violate both of these precepts taught by Jesus Himself.  When we unleash a verbal barrage meant to embarrass, shame, or bully people online, we are hardly showing forth the character of the One we are supposed to become more like each day.

James said that we bless God and curse our fellow man with the same tongue and this should not be so…even online.

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How Is Your Phone Changing You? Part 9
September 18, 2017, 1:06 pm
Filed under: Articles, Book Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I recently came across a book by Tony Reinke entitled, “12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You”.  The title intrigued me because I have suspected some of this has been going on for years.  In the book, Tony is not anti-phone, but encourages the reader to be mindful of changes that are happening in us because of our use of our cell phones.

So far, we have considered that our phones are encouraging us to become addicted to distraction, have encouraged us to ignore flesh and blood relationships that require effort and risk on our part, and that they have encouraged us to crave immediate approval.  We have also seen that our phones are changing us is that they are robbing us of literacy and causing us to feed on the produced images others want us to see as well as changing us to become what we spend time with online.  Our phones are also making more connected when alone and more alone when we are with others.  They also give us the ability to engage in secret vices with virtually no one near us knowing what we are up to.  These are examples of how our phones are changing us.

Another way that our phones are changing us is in the way that our phones encourage us to lose context crucial to meaning.  People post information on social media at an alarming rate.  It is amazing that there is just over 7.5 billion people in the world.  2.5 billion of these have social media accounts.  That is 1/3 of the earth’s population.  On just Facebook alone, there are 2.4 million status updates every minute.  That is 144 million an hour. 3.5 billion per day, and 1.3 trillion per year.  Yes, trillion.  And that is only Facebook!  Twitter sees 6000 tweets per second.  That is 360 thousand per minute, 21.6 million per hour, 518 million per day, nearly 190 billion per year.  Add the rest of the social media platforms, and there is a deluge of information like no other time in history.

What does this deluge of information produce in the hearts and minds of consumers?  First, it contributes to a desensitizing of our hearts.  We talked about this in a previous article, but it causes us to lose our ability to empathize because we simply don’t have the time.  We have to move on to the next article, post, tweet, snap chat, or pin.

Additionally, sense most of what we read on social media is not mentally nutritional, it affects our desire for deeper, more complex, or mentally stretching information.  When given the choice between reading about what celebrities of our day look like now and reading about the newest technology for more efficient delivery of clean drinking water to East Africa, most consumers follow the stars.  While this is not an absolute statement, the statistics show us that this is the behavioral choice for most in this situation.

A corollary to this is the fact that most information is accept at face value with no thought of context, truthfulness, or even applicability.  When the consumer consumes hours of product commercials, kid videos, cat videos, or other such input, there is no thought as to if this is a true representation of a product, life, or pet behavior.  There is also no thought as to how God might call one to act to help in a situation.  For instance, you read a post about girls being sold into sexual slavery right here in Liberal, Kansas.  You read the article, shake your head for a moment and then move on to the next post about the football team, weather, or something else unrelated.  Rather than contemplating what God might be saying about the establishment of a new ministry, or your personal involvement in a new issue, we move on without feeling what we should.

News outlets realize this and capitalize on it for their own profitability.  For instance, a story is run with some unverified aspects of the story because we have to get the information out there.  In years gone by, there would have been people on the ground.  They would have been verifying facts, getting names, dates, and other pertinent data before presenting the story.  If there were facts that we errant, they would have come back at a later date and apologized for the mistake.  Now, the information is broadcast immediately because it has to be.  There is no checking of facts, or very little.  When there is a mistake, there is no mention or it is blamed on some other issue.  Combine this with the hapless consumer and you have a dangerous situation that teaches us to either not trust or not care.

The only counterbalance I know to this effect is to follow Proverbs 1 and seek for wisdom and treasure wisdom and choose to be selective on what and when we read.  We need to pray and ask God for discernment and wisdom and submit our ways to Him.



How Is Your Phone Changing You? Part 5

I recently came across a book by Tony Reinke entitled, “12 Ways Your Phone Is Changing You”.  The title intrigued me because I have suspected some of this has been going on for years.  In the book, Tony is not anti-phone, but encourages the reader to be mindful of changes that are happening in us because of our use of our cell phones.

So far, we have considered that our phones are encouraging us to become addicted to distraction, have encouraged us to ignore flesh and blood relationships that require effort and risk on our part, and that they have encouraged us to crave immediate approval.  We have also seen that our phones are changing us is that they are robbing us of literacy.  These are examples of how our phones are changing us.

Another way that our phones are changing us might not seem so obvious on the surface.  Oh, the effect will be apparent, but the deleterious aspects might not be.  Our phones are tempting us to become those who feed on the produced.  What does that mean?  I am glad you asked.

Our nation has created a class of person that other generations and other nations have not known.  We have people that are famous for nothing other than being famous.  We no longer have heroes that are actually heroic, but we have celebrities that are celebrities because of their celebrity.  In order for them to remain famous, they must remain the spotlight, in the news, or trending on social media.  How do they accomplish this?  Through produced moments in the sun.  Whether it is a contrived celebration or a made-up catastrophe, the only way for them to remain famous is the remain in the social conscious.  Not only do they benefit from this, but those who pay for endorsement deals with them must have this constant social conscious or their investments do not pay off for them.

What does that have to do with you and I?  First, we have been fed these produced moments so regularly that we find we must have them to continue to be the rabid fans of our favorite celebrities.  We find ourselves checking their social media, searching google for the latest news of their exploits or going to the latest gossip sights hoping for a glimpse into their lives.  We feel like we actually know them, but don’t realize they are feeding us the produced parts of their lives.  That is one of the reasons that we feel such shock when one of our celebrities takes his or her life or gets arrested for a heinous crime.

Additionally, we find ourselves wanting badly in their company.  No, not the way people used to stalk celebrities by hanging around outside their house hoping for an autograph, but we actually want to be in their number.  With social media, we can be.  We can get a million people to like a video of us making a sandwich and we are celebrities for an instant.  We can begin to produce our own lives and cause people to approve, which we talked about in a previous article.

Another byproduct of this effect is that many of us are not actually living in the moments we find ourselves because we are so busy trying to produce moments for others or trying to capture the moment, but paradoxically ignore the moment with our capturing.  Instead of watching our children perform in their school musical, we are busy staring at our phones to make sure they are in frame, the app is working properly, the recording is working, the lighting is right, we have zoomed into the right distance, etc.  Instead of enjoying the performance, we are distracted from the moment we are so busy producing for others.

If we are not careful, this obsession with produced moments actually can lead us to attempt to take God’s place as the Creator and Sustainer of our world and our lives.  God spoke and created everything.  Those things tell us about what He made, but it also tells us about Him.  He is creative, personal, enjoys variety, etc.  When we begin to obsess over the produced moments of our lives, we are subtly telling God what He created was fine for then, but we will take it from there.  For some, this might even mean that we are telling God that He has not done well enough for us so we have to attempt to generate more through our productions.  Ultimately, this can lead us to the point that we no longer appreciate our lives or what God has done for us.

So, the next time you are out with your children, will you be WITH your children, or will you be leveraging your time with your children for the benefit of others who are just as stuck on produced moments as you are in producing them?



On Earth As It Is In Heaven or In Heaven As It Is On Earth?

I know that I have written on this topic before, but recently, I was reading the description of the throne room of heaven in Revelation 4 and 5.  Here is what I noticed about heaven.

First, John is shown heaven, but the first thing that catches his eye is the throne and God seated on that throne.  John is nearly overcome with the scene.  He noticed the colors, sounds, and focus of heaven as being totally about God on the throne.  From rainbows, to thunder and lightning, to creatures and lamps of fire, John gives the picture that all of heaven is focused on the worship of God Almighty.

Next, John mentioned the cries of the living creatures as they proclaim the holiness of God when they say, “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God, the Almighty, Who was and Who is and Who is to come.”  They all give God glory and recognize the focus of heaven is God.

Additionally, John mentioned the twenty-four elders joining in on the worship.  They cast their crowns before the throne as they confess, “Worthy are You, our Lord and our God, to receive glory and honor and power; for You created all things, and because of Your will they existed, and were created.”

Lastly, even when it came time to begin to open the scroll, all of heaven was focused on God the Father and God the Son as Jesus was the only One worthy to open the scroll that would mark the end of times and the judgments and deliverances that were to come.

As one looks at this version of heaven, one is left with a sick feeling that much else we have heard of heaven may or may not be accurate.  For many people, the idea of heaven is them finally getting everything they want.  They will be comforted, pampered, served, catered to, and never expected to do anything.  God will exist to serve their needs.  This is not heaven as God has described it to us.

It seems that in heaven, we will realize what it was we wanted all along.  We will finally get to see God on the throne of heaven!  We will no longer worship an invisible God, but will see Him as He is.  We will get to join in the activity of heaven and worship God for eternity.  We will know that we are in heaven because of God’s will and we will be challenged as we see Him high and lifted up.

Now, you might be thinking that this version of heaven does not sound appealing because it is not focused on you.  Perhaps the problem with much of our lives now is that we think too much should be focused on us.  As it is, we think we are owed respect.  We think we have a right to be honored.  We think others should serve us.  That is what causes a lot of the heartache we experience.  People disrespect us and we get mad.  They devalue us and we feel hurt.  They demand that we serve them and we feel cheated.

If heaven teaches us anything, it teaches us of the holiness of God and His rightful, ruling place over all creation and beyond.  We are not the focus.  He is.  For many, this is hard to take.

So, what do we do with this knowledge?  Perhaps, it is as simple as putting others first and serving them.  Perhaps it is as simple as honoring those who faithfully serve us.  There may be many other applications, but they would all seem to indicate we need to be changed so that our focus on earth is as it will be in heaven, if we know Jesus as Lord and Savior.



My Bible Adventure: Much More Than A Book of Children’s Bible Stories

I recently received a copy of My Bible Adventure Through God’s Word.  I anticipated being a bit underwhelmed by yet another simplified and dumbed down children’s Bible, but I was completely pleasantly surprised.  This Bible is so much more than that!

First, you actually get some Bible.  Many of these Bible books don’t actually give you any Bible.  They just give you a pre-digested version.  This one actually gives you some text.  Additionally, the book gives you an explanation or commentary on the Bible passage.  It is written on the child’s level, but does not assume the child needs things so watered down as to not be recognizable.

After the commentary, comes a prayer that you can pray with your little one.  You can either have them read it and pray it or, as we do with my 7-year old daughter, you can pray the prayer together.

Lastly, the Bible has a feature that I have not seen before.  It is a section called, “Take It With You”.  This is a short restatement of the key truth from the passage you have read that night.  This helps to make sure that you can remember and restate what you have read.

The book is broken up into 52 weekly readings, but we have used it nightly and it has not been too much.

I would say this Bible is usable and helpful for preschoolers up to about 8 or 9 years old.

I received this book from Book look in exchange for my honest review.



Ever Wish You Knew the Bible Better?

Have you ever wanted more out of your Bible reading, or have you ever wondered why it seems that others get so much when you get so little?  Perhaps you should do more than read.  Perhaps you should think deeply about scripture, spend time with it, replay it throughout the day, or meditate on Scripture.

I know that you might be thinking, “That is too hard or complicated!   I wouldn’t even know where to begin!”  Actually that is the very reason that Robert J. Morgan wrote the book, Reclaiming the Lost Art of Biblical Meditation:  Find True Peace in Jesus.  Morgan’s book is like having a master walk beside the reader to help with Biblical Meditation.  The book is a treasure trove of information, inspiration, illustration, and rumination, with absolutely no condemnation for any who have not tried to spend more or more serious time in God’s Word.

Each chapter is designed to give the reader a benefit of Biblical meditation.  In the chapter, Morgan tells the reader why they should meditate on scripture and gives examples that flesh out the ideas into actual life lessons.

In addition to the chapters, there is also scattered throughout the small volume, on the green pages, specific suggestions for how to get started.  This helps to make sure that the whole process does not seem to be just for the professionals, but puts the cookies on the bottom shelf for the rest of us.

Additionally, there is a 10-day meditation guide at the back where Morgan walks the reader through the method with helpful pointers and suggestions along the way.  Each day gives the reader a scripture, context, and some thoughts to help with the meditation process.

As bonus, at the end of the book, Morgan gives the reader an additional list of scriptures so that the process can become a habit for life.

I have been meditating on scripture for years, and I found this book to be simple, yet helpful.  I found it to be inspiring without being so far above everyone’s heads to make it unreachable.  I also found it so immediately applicable and practical that there really is no reason that a person could come away from the book questioning the importance, impact, or impassable process so crucial to Christian Growth.

This would be a great book to read on your own or with your children.  It would also be great to be used in church or in a small group setting.  It could also be incorporated into a discipleship strategy for new believers, but that is only the benefit to be had outside of the reader’s heart and mind.  Inside the heart and mind, there is no way to estimate its value or exhaust its uses.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”



What Makes A Great Leader?
May 5, 2017, 2:48 pm
Filed under: Articles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Over the years, there have been some fantastic works on this subject.  Oswald Chambers’ Spiritual Leadership, Henry Blackaby and Henry Brandt’s Power of the Call, Henry Blackaby’s Spiritual Leaderhsip, Aubrey Malphurs’ Leading Leaders, James Garlow’s 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership Tested by Time, Os Guiness’ When No One Sees and Tony Morgan’s Killing Cockroaches are just some Christian examples.  But when you get down to the basics of leadership, you really only have to deal with one definition.  What is that definition?  Simply…are people following?  If they are, you are a leader.  If they are not, you are not a leader.  It is that simple.  It actually has nothing to do with degrees (and, yes, I do have some of these).  It has nothing to do with how many leadership books you have read (I have those, too!).  It also has nothing to do with how many positions of leadership you have found yourself in (yep, this is also me!).  The simple question is…are people following?

Jesus was a great leader.  He had followers.  Paul was a great leader.  He had followers.  Peter was a great leader.  He had followers.  James was a great leader.  He had followers.  John was a great leader.  He had followers.  These men were all great leaders.  In our day, Billy Graham was a great leader.  He had followers.  Beth Moore is a great leader.  She has followers.  Anne Graham Lotz is a great leader.  She has followers.  John Piper, John MacArthur, Luis Palau, Crawford Loritts, Chip Ingram, Stormie Omartian.  All great leaders.  All have followers.  But what does it take to be a great leader?

Gordon MacDonald, in his book, Building Below the Waterline, lists four key strengths of great leaders.  I find these helpful and would encourage all of us that lead to look for these in our own lives.

Are you able to communicate vision?  Jesus told His disciples about the Kingdom of Heaven in terms they could understand.  He described it as a field to farmers, as a net of fish to fishermen, as sheep and goats to shepherds and so on and so forth.  What Jesus was doing in this was casting vision to His followers, so that they would get of glimpse of what He could clearly see.  Perhaps the reason that we don’t have more people following as leaders is because we can’t communicate vision because we have none.  We just want to get through the week without killing anyone or losing our jobs.  The height of the Christian experience for most Christian leaders is simply measured by how many times I gave in to whatever temptation I am struggling with at the moment.  A great leader sees a great vision with great clarity and communicates it the same way.

Are you sensitive to people?  This is another trait of a great leader.  Too many times, we see people as an interruption to the ministry we could have.  We tend to think they need to lead, follow or get out of the way.  While this might be right for them to wrestle with, a great leader is also sensitive to their needs, fears, limitations, etc.  Perhaps that person that seems like a wet blanket to all of your plans just can’t see your vision and maybe it is because they have been in this situation before and were hurt through it.  Maybe they need time to process what you have communicated.  Maybe they are just afraid of the unknown.  A great leader with be sensitive to these possibilities and will consider them when communicating his vision.

Can you assess situation accurately?  A great leader must be able to walk into a situation and realize who is in charge by title and who is in charge by personality.  A great leader must be able to recognize people whose expertise puts them in charge and who is simply in charge because they draw their self-esteem from being in charge.  He or she must also be able to recognize when the ship is driving itself because no one is in charge.  Additionally, a great leader must be able to look through the smoke and mirrors and see what is really going on.  (Notice how these competencies complement each other?)

Lastly, a great leader must also know him or herself.  Too often, we don’t know ourselves very well and that lack of knowledge makes communicating our visions tough.  It keeps us from being sensitive to people and it prevents us from properly assessing our situations.  We need to know if we are leading from some of the motives listed earlier.  We need to know our physical, emotional and spiritual strengths and weaknesses.

Leadership is simply defined as…is anyone following; however, people will want to follow leaders that can effectively see and communicate vision.  They will gravitate to those that are sensitive to people.  They will get on board with those that can assess situations with clarity of purpose.  They will be drawn to work with and serve a leader that knows his or herself with honesty to keep from using others to simply achieve their purposes.  Know of any leaders like that?  Are you one?  Would you like to be?  I would like to be some day.  How about you?