Meanderings of a Minister


Are We Fighting the Right Wars?
December 5, 2017, 1:49 pm
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I am sure that the title of this article will resonate differently with different people.  Just this last week, we remembered our Veterans on Veteran’s Day.  For many of those Veterans, especially the Vietnam Era Veterans, this is a question that stirs up feelings of betrayal and abandonment as our nation and its citizens failed this group by refusing to recognize their sacrifice and service because of a select group of people that characterized them poorly.  For others, they are tempted to say we should not be fighting in any of the conflicts we now face. That is not the way I posed the question, but it is probably a good example of how we are failing.  Allow me to explain.

In 1 Timothy 6:11-16, Paul wrote the following words to Timothy:

“But flee from these things, you man of God, and pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance and gentleness. Fight the good fight of faith; take hold of the eternal life to which you were called, and you made the good confession in the presence of many witnesses. I charge you in the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who testified the good confession before Pontius Pilate, that you keep the commandment without stain or reproach until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ, which He will bring about at the proper time—He who is the blessed and only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords, who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light, whom no man has seen or can see. To Him be honor and eternal dominion! Amen.”[1]

In this passage, Paul says that Timothy is to pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance and gentleness.  That is the fight we should be fighting.  As believers, that is the focus of living out the salvation we have been given.  Sadly, many have turned their backs on fighting for these things.  Since they are not fighting the war we have been called to fight, they turn and focus on many other things.  We criticize the Baptists because they don’t dance, the Pentecostals because they dance in church, the Lutherans because they are so predictable, the Charismatics because they don’t plan anything, the Hispanics because they are always late, or the Anglos because they are so caught up on time.  We find any number of things to fight about because we are not fighting the war we have been saved to fight.

We even carry this outside the Church, where we turn to the ballot box to try to accomplish what we are not willing to carry out ourselves.  We blame the government for handling the care of seniors so poorly when we were called to that task.  We blame the government for messing up everything from public education to healthcare to the definition of life.  The government was never given this war to fight, but, since we chose not to fight it, government took it over and then we are shocked that government handles it differently than we would.

Perhaps, on this week when we have spent some time thanking and thinking about the Veterans, and as we prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving,  it is time for us to get serious about living for God with all of our hearts, setting that example for others, sharing Jesus with our neighbors, and stop sitting in front of our various screens typing and talking about how things should be different and actually help to make them different.

It won’t be easy, but war never is.

[1] New American Standard Bible: 1995 Update. LaHabra, CA: The Lockman Foundation, 1995.

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“I Wish God Would Show Up Like He Used To”
October 27, 2017, 10:36 am
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I cannot tell you how many times I have heard or even said this, “I wish God would show up like He used to.”  Recently, I have been reading a book by J. Oswald Sanders, Spiritual Maturity.  In the book, Sanders takes on this very question and comes to a little different conclusion.  As a matter of fact, he counters with the question, “Are you REALLY sure you want that?”  Consider the following examples:

Job saw a vision of God.  His character was blameless in his own mind.  He even said, “I am clean without transgression, I am innocent; neither is there iniquity in me.”  (Job 33:9)  God even affirmed this in 1:8 when he asked Satan if he had seen Job, His faithful servant.  How did Job react to the vision of God?  “I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear; but now thine eye seeth Thee.  Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes.”  (Job 42:5-6)

Jacob saw a vision of God.  He wrestled with God.  When God asked him his name, Jacob responded with his name as defining his character.  “Confronted by the vision of God, the man who had succeeded in deceiving others was compelled to acknowledge his own secret shame.”

Moses was another man who saw a vision of God.  He had attempted to deliver Israel from Egyptian abuse by his own power, but had to run away.  He lived passively in Midian watching sheep until one day when he came upon the burning busy.  How did Moses, the mighty man of God, respond?  “And Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God.”  (Exodus 3:6)

Elijah saw a vision of God.  Elijah, the prophet who faced off against 450 prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel and experienced God in a dramatic fashion.  Elijah, who prayed and the heavens were shut up and who prayed and they were let loose.  The one who experienced the great, strong wind that tore the mountains apart, the one who saw the earthquake that shook the ground, the one who felt the heat of the fire, how did He respond?  When God showed up in the still small voice, “when Elijah heard it, that he wrapped his face in his mantle.”  (1 Kings 19:13)  He could not look at God.

Isaiah saw a vision of God.  The one who would tell of the coming Messiah saw a vision of God.  The one who would, inspired by the Holy Spirit, announce woes on all of the enemies of Israel, and on Israel herself, saw a vision of God.  How did he react?  He was undone!  He cried out to God using the same woe that he would use to denounce his enemies.  He saw himself as unclean compared to the holiness of God.  He fainted away from the presence of God.

Saul was blinded by the vision of the risen Christ.  John was terrified at the Son of God who showed up to give him the Revelation.  On and on the list could go.  When God showed up, people fainted, became like dead men, were made intensely aware of their sin, ran away, were blinded, hid themselves, averted their eyes, averted their faces, and cried out in panic.  And we say we want God to show up like He used to?

Perhaps, rather than look for a vision of God, we ought to look into the Word of God.  The average American owns three Bibles, but less than 10 percent of Bibles purchased in the United States actually ever get read.  Churches offer Bible studies at their churches and very few people avail themselves of the opportunity.  The average Christian does not witness to their neighbor because they do not feel like they know enough scripture, but also are not doing anything about it.  Entire denominations have set the Bible aside to follow tradition, what feels good, what won’t offend, or what is shiny in the moment.  Perhaps we need to spend more time with our face in God’s Book than on Facebook.  Perhaps we need to spend time reading of more characters in the Bible than trying to format our message in 140 characters on Twitter.  Maybe we need to pin our hopes on our relationship with Jesus than on the pictures we can post on Pintrest.  Maybe we need to spend more time chatting with Jesus than Snap Chatting with friends.  Maybe we need to link in with God’s Holy Spirit more than we are Linked In with our business associates.  Maybe we need to spend more time on knee mail than email.

We don’t so much need for God to show up as for us to show up for worship, daily devotion, sacrificial giving, selfless serving and enthusiastic evangelism.  Just a thought.



On The Road Again

As I write this article, I have been home for a couple of days and am preparing to leave on a mission trip to Haiti.  I have been to Tennessee for a week, Children’s Camp in Salina for a week, Phoenix for our denominational convention for a week, and now I will be heading to Haiti for eight days.  I have been amazed to consider what God has taught me at each stage in this journey.  While I am certain that my travels are of no consequence, I hope that the lessons I am learning will be.

First, I took a week’s vacation prior to a very busy Summer.  I am grateful to my church family for allowing us the time off prior to a very busy season of ministry.  Vacations are kind of hard for me because I like to be active for the Kingdom and vacations seem not to be this way.  Having said that, I know that this vacation was necessary prior to so much time away from my family.  Psalm 85:6 says, “Will You not revive us again, that Your people may rejoice in You?”  This time of vacation was a very necessary time of recharging both for me and for my family.  God helped me to understand that part of revival is getting still and allowing Him to work and move while you rest.

Next was Children’s Camp.  At camp, I had the wonderful privilege to pray with many children.  Some to surrender their lives to Christ as Lord and Savior.  I got the chance to love on kids by listening to their stories, watching them conquer fears, and celebrating with them as they shared their gifts and talents in worship of the King.  In the New Living Translation of the Bible, Ephesians 2:10 reads, “For we are God’s masterpiece.  He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the good things He planned for us long ago.”  As I reflected on this verse throughout the week, I realized that part of my struggles is that I never feel adequate.  I never feel like I measure up to people’s expectations.  I always feel like I am trying to earn my place at the table with the spiritual giants.  Meditation on this verse helped me to hear God’s voice as He encouraged me to be who He created me to be.  If I live for Him and He lives through me, then I am enough because He sees me as His child.

At our convention, I was blessed to be able to listen to various preachers as they preached through the entire book of Philippians.  One of the messages that really stood out to me, the young preacher said, “The only way for Philippians 1:21 to be true is if Jesus is Who I am living for.  If I am living for anything else, then death takes away what I am living for.  If I am living for Jesus, death brings me to the One I have been living for.”  This really challenged me to ask the question, “What am I living for?”  If I am living for men’s applause, then death with take that from me.  If I am living for family, death will take that from me.  If I am living for fame, power, promotion, retirement, graduation, independence, etc., then death will take those things from me.  If I am living for Jesus and for God’s glory, then death brings that to me.

As I prepare to head off to Haiti, I am also mindful of the scripture that says, “The mind of man plans his way, but the LORD directs his steps.”  (Proverbs 16:9)  The last three years, I have either had to leave Haiti early to return for urgent ministry needs, or I have been prevented from flying due to weather, problems with the plane, etc.  So, I am planning to go to Haiti.  I have packed.  I have bought my ticket.  I have prepared.  I am planning to go.  But whether or not I go is up to God.  It is His mission to which we go, so it is His will and His plan for whether I get there or not.  Now, if I could just learn this in all areas of life.

So, God uses everyday events to teach us eternal lessons.  This is what Jesus did with parables and how He taught His disciples.  What is He teaching you?



Ever Wish You Knew the Bible Better?

Have you ever wanted more out of your Bible reading, or have you ever wondered why it seems that others get so much when you get so little?  Perhaps you should do more than read.  Perhaps you should think deeply about scripture, spend time with it, replay it throughout the day, or meditate on Scripture.

I know that you might be thinking, “That is too hard or complicated!   I wouldn’t even know where to begin!”  Actually that is the very reason that Robert J. Morgan wrote the book, Reclaiming the Lost Art of Biblical Meditation:  Find True Peace in Jesus.  Morgan’s book is like having a master walk beside the reader to help with Biblical Meditation.  The book is a treasure trove of information, inspiration, illustration, and rumination, with absolutely no condemnation for any who have not tried to spend more or more serious time in God’s Word.

Each chapter is designed to give the reader a benefit of Biblical meditation.  In the chapter, Morgan tells the reader why they should meditate on scripture and gives examples that flesh out the ideas into actual life lessons.

In addition to the chapters, there is also scattered throughout the small volume, on the green pages, specific suggestions for how to get started.  This helps to make sure that the whole process does not seem to be just for the professionals, but puts the cookies on the bottom shelf for the rest of us.

Additionally, there is a 10-day meditation guide at the back where Morgan walks the reader through the method with helpful pointers and suggestions along the way.  Each day gives the reader a scripture, context, and some thoughts to help with the meditation process.

As bonus, at the end of the book, Morgan gives the reader an additional list of scriptures so that the process can become a habit for life.

I have been meditating on scripture for years, and I found this book to be simple, yet helpful.  I found it to be inspiring without being so far above everyone’s heads to make it unreachable.  I also found it so immediately applicable and practical that there really is no reason that a person could come away from the book questioning the importance, impact, or impassable process so crucial to Christian Growth.

This would be a great book to read on your own or with your children.  It would also be great to be used in church or in a small group setting.  It could also be incorporated into a discipleship strategy for new believers, but that is only the benefit to be had outside of the reader’s heart and mind.  Inside the heart and mind, there is no way to estimate its value or exhaust its uses.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”



Count Your Many Blessings
March 31, 2017, 1:50 pm
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Have you ever stopped to think about all of the blessings you have been given just by virtue of the fact that you are a believer in and follower or Jesus Christ?  Ephesians 1 lists seven of these blessings.  Perhaps in reading through the following list, we can embody Proverbs 14:30, which says, “A tranquil heart is life to the body, but envy makes the bones rot.”  Here is that list from Ephesians 1.[1]

Blessing #1:  God has chosen us to be holy and blameless.  (Ephesians 1:4)

This means that, if you are a believer in Jesus Christ, God has chosen you and drawn you into relationship with Him.  He has begun a good work in you and will complete it. (Philippians 1:6)  He is giving you the desire daily to live for Him.  (Ephesians 2:13)  God already sees you the way you are going to be when you become what He is leading you to want to become.

Blessing #2:  God has adopted us into His family.  (Ephesians 1:4-6)

This means that you are wanted by God.  He is not stuck with you.  He knew you before you were born (Psalm 139).  He wrote your name down in the book of life before you came to be.  (Revelation 13:8)(Ephesians 1:4)  He chose you.  He loves you.  You are part of His family with all of the privileges that come along with being a child of the King!

Blessing #3:  We are redeemed and forgiven.  (Ephesians 1:7-8)

This means that the ransom has been paid to deliver us when we were incapable of delivering ourselves.  He loosed us from the demands of sin.  (Romans 6:23)  He purchased us and set us free.  He cancelled our debt.  We owe nothing for our sin because He already paid for it.  When we sin, He advocates on our behalf.  (1 John 2:1)

Blessing #4:  God has shown us the mystery of His will.  (Ephesians 1:9-10)

This means that we no longer have to worry about living for or carrying out the will of God in our lives.  For most of us, we get to a fork in the road of our lives and wonder, “What is God’s will for me in this situation?”  We really don’t have to ask this because we already know the answer.  God’s will for me in every situation is to glorify Him.  To point people towards praising the grace of God.  For many of life’s situations, we needn’t stand paralyzed at the fork in the road because in Christ, we should be living out this will everyday.  Jesus showed us the example in that He lived for and glorified God in every circumstance.  (John 17:4)

Blessing #5:  We are chosen for an inheritance.  (Ephesians 1:11-12)

This means that we are chosen to receive not just heaven, although that would be enough.  We are also chosen for an inheritance of God’s love, nearness, and presence in our lives.  We are also to receive an inheritance such as is described in the promises to the overcomers in Revelation 2-3.

Blessing #6:  We are included in Christ.  (Ephesians 1:13)

This means that I am in Christ.  Inside, covered by His righteousness, identified by His Name and considered His brother and fellow heirs (Romans 8:17).  When God looks at us, He does not see the sin we so struggle with.  Instead, He sees the righteousness of His Son that is being accounted unto us by grace, through faith.

Blessing #7:  We have the guarantee of the Holy Spirit.  (Ephesians 1:13-14)

This means that I already have the down payment for what is to come.  I have the seal of God that is an indication of His promise that I am His and will be for eternity.  (1 Corinthians 12:3)

With all of these blessings, why do we chase after others that don’t even come close to measuring up?  We are encouraged by some to seek parking places close to the store, bigger cars, fancier clothes, etc.  All of these “blessings” will burn up and will be gone in an instant.  The blessings described in Ephesians 1 will never go away.

Count your blessings!

[1] Holladay, Tom.  Great Chapters of the Bible:  Ephesians Chapter One, Discover Your Spiritual Blessings.  Rancho Santa Margarita, CA: Saddleback Resources, 2010.



Why Are You Good?
March 22, 2017, 1:53 pm
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There is a bad joke that sometimes runs around churches.  It goes like this: “Pastors are paid to be good.  The rest of the church is good for nothing.”  While people sometimes laugh at the joke, the bigger question that this joke poses is, “Why are you good?”

There are many answers to this question, depending upon each person’s motivation.  Some people are good because they hope that they can somehow be good enough to earn God’s love.  They think that they have to stop doing bad stuff, start doing good stuff, or increase their output of good stuff so that God will love them.  The problem with this kind of thinking is myriad and manifold.  First, the Bible clearly tells us, “For all of us have become like one who is unclean, And all our righteous deeds are like a filthy garment; And all of us wither like a leaf, And our iniquities, like the wind, take us away.” (Isaiah 64:6, NASB95)  The best we can do, compared to God, is like filthy rags.  We could never do enough to earn God’s love.  Even trying to earn God’s love is such a cheapening of the value of God’s love that we are continuing in sin just for thinking so.

Others might think that they are good because it is what God demands.  With no real love in their hearts, they attempt to obey God out of a sense of religious duty.  Like the older son in the Jesus’ parable of the prodigal son, they think, “’Look! For so many years I have been serving you and I have never neglected a command of yours; and yet you have never given me a young goat, so that I might celebrate with my friends;” (Luke 15:29, NASB95) Or like the servant given one talent, ““And the one also who had received the one talent came up and said, ‘Master, I knew you to be a hard man, reaping where you did not sow and gathering where you scattered no seed. ‘And I was afraid, and went away and hid your talent in the ground. See, you have what is yours.’” (Matthew 25:24–25, NASB95) They think that obeying God is their duty.

Still yet others, wrongly think, like Paul anticipated some of the Romans would think, “What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin so that grace may increase?” (Romans 6:1, NASB95) In other words, they think that sin is no big deal.  They will simply commit the sins they want to commit and then will turn to God for His forgiveness once they have gotten their way, achieved their goal, etc.  The problem with this sort of thinking is that they forget two things.

First, they forget, “For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 6:23, NASB95) They forget that God takes sin so seriously that He sent His Son to die on the cross for the sins that kept people from a relationship with Him and that prevented them from recognizing that He is sovereign and on the throne.

They also forget that Paul’s reaction to the question posed in Romans 6:1 is Romans 6:2 and following: “May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it? Or do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus have been baptized into His death? Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.” (Romans 6:2–4, NASB95)

So, what is the answer.  Why are we good?  Romans 6:2-4 above hints to the answer, but the answer is given so plainly within this and many other passages.  For instance, “Therefore, having these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all defilement of flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.” (2 Corinthians 7:1, NASB95)  We are good because we get to be. (1 Cor 2:14).  We are good because we have been so blessed by God and that goodness has so infected our lives that we want to be good because to be good is to be like God.  We want to become more like Him every day.  That is the mark of a true believer.

So…why are you good?



God Never Gives Up On His People
March 16, 2017, 1:53 pm
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I was recently reading in Exodus about Nadab and Abihu.  Now, I realize that most people must look up those names, but they are very important figures in the Old Testament.  Let me tell you about them and why they are so important.  First, they were important because they were the sons of Aaron whom God personally chose to become priests to serve before Him in the Tabernacle.  Imagine being the first priest called by God to serve.  But go further than that and imagine being called by God’s own voice! (Exodus 28:1)

Next, they were important because they were part of the seventy that had worshipped God on the mountain and had come down and had prophesied before the people and helped Moses shoulder the load of speaking to the people on God’s behalf. (Exodus 24:1)

Lastly, they were important because they decided, in spite of the instructions God had given, to offer strange fire on the altar and God killed them on the spot. (Number 3:4)

Okay, so you are thinking…” Thanks!  Now I’m depressed.  If God could do that to them, then what about me?”  I want us to learn from Nadab and Ahibu, but I want us to learn from their lives, not their deaths.  God personally called them.  Since I believe in the omniscience of God (omni=all, science=knowledge…God knows everything), then I have to believe that He knew they would fail, but HE CALLED THEM ANYWAY!  What does that mean?  What does that mean to me?

What this means to me is that, in spite of my worst failures, God will continue to give me chances.  In spite of my worst stumbling, He never gives up on reaching out to me.  No matter how little faith I have, God, the author of faith, is always there and always offering His Hands.  If I will spend more time looking up for His help and reaching out for His forgiveness, I can spend less time carrying a heavy guilt load and a bunch of shame I was not meant to carry.

Here’s the best part.  If you are a new creature in Christ, you can do the same.  If you have surrendered your life to Christ, He will never turn away.  (Romans 5:9-10) He will never put you to shame and He will in no wise cast you out.  (John 6:37) I don’t know about you, but that is great news to me.  I feel more like Paul all the time in Romans 7,

“For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. But if I do the very thing I do not want to do, I agree with the Law, confessing that the Law is good.  So now, no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh; for the willing is present in me, but the doing of the good is not. For the good that I want, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want. But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good.  For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin.”  (NASB)

Isn’t it good to know God won’t give up on you?  Why not take the time today and thank Him for just that reason?  Having thanked Him, let’s hang on and get it right so that we don’t end up like Nadab and Abihu.