Meanderings of a Minister


Saying Goodbye
April 30, 2015, 11:12 am
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Goodbye

Early this morning, we lost a great example.  Let me explain.  Virgil E. McWilliams, Jr., known to most of us as “Mac” passed away this morning.  No, this is not his obituary.  That will be coming later from the family.  As I have reflected on Mac’s life, I realized that I have just witnessed a man who died well.

First, Mac was diagnosed with a form of cancer that usually leads to a very painful and debilitating death.  This was the path that Mac went down and that makes the way he endured all the more amazing and inspirational.  He was in tremendous pain and endured not being able to eat and all of the unpleasantness that comes with it.  Even with the pain and suffering, Mac and I visited last Friday for a few hours and he said something that is very rare to hear in our day.  He said, “I have no complaints.  I have had a good life.  I have a good wife.  I have an amazing family.  I have traveled and experienced much of this world and all it has to offer.  But most of all, I have the Lord on my side and that is more than I could have hoped for.”  In spite of all he was going through, he was thankful to God.

Next, Mac was appreciative of everything and everyone.  Even the day I visited with him, it took a toll on him, but he wanted me to stay and visit.  As we sat on his back porch, he talked about how thankful he was to God for all of the things I listed above.  He talked about how thankful he was for his Sunday School class and the fellowship they share.  He talked about how thankful he was for his wife.  He did not think he would ever find anyone like Margaret and vastly enjoyed being married to her.  Even she said there was not a day that went by without Mac telling her how much he appreciated her, how lovely she is, or how much he loved her.  He was thankful for his kids, grandkids, and great grandkids.  He was thankful for his house.  He was thankful because the doctor had said he had three months to live and it had been something like fourteen months ago!  Even in pain and suffering, Mac was appreciative of others and all he had.

Mac was also selfless.  Every time I visited with Mac, at church, in the car, or at home, he was always offering me something.  He wanted to make sure people were taken care of.  If it was not offering me his famous peanut brittle, it was produce from his amazing and bountiful garden, books from his library, or any other manner of things he thought would benefit me.  This last Friday, he even offered to get up and go into the house and get me a Diet Coke.  Here he was less than a week from death and in great pain and he was concerned because it was a little warm and I did not have a cold drink.  That was Mac.  He was that way with the granddaughters.  He wanted to make sure they were safe and that they got an education, but also that they had what they needed.  He would fix wind chimes, lawn mowers, bicycles, toys, or anything else they needed because he wanted to make sure they were taken care of.

Lastly, Mac was positive, but also realistic.  Over the last year or so, after being diagnosed, Mac would always say that he was thankful for the time he had, but that it was somewhat borrowed time.  He would say that the doctors had given him three months, but that the doctors are not God.  God knew the plans He had for Mac and for Mac’s life.  Early on, Mac would say he felt okay, but that he knew it was going to get worse.  Mac would even say that he looked forward to heaven, but that he wanted to make sure those left behind did not have to hurt.  He talked about his faith in God and how he knew he was forgiven, but that he knew that he had much to be forgiven for.  We even talked about some family relationships that Mac wished were different, but knew that people have to do things their own way.

While there is more that can and will be said about Mac McWilliams, about his life, travels, career as a Veterinarian, military service, oil field work, etc., I guess I am most thankful in this moment that Mac has shown me what it is to die well.  That may sound strange, but Mac has shown me how to die well.  To die with dignity, thankfulness, hope, realism, compassion, appreciation, but most of all with the confidence that comes from a rock-solid faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord.  When I die, I hope I can face death with that same understanding, hope, and dignity.  Thanks, Mac for showing me,

Though the fig tree should not blossom And there be no fruit on the vines, Though the yield of the olive should fail And the fields produce no food, Though the flock should be cut off from the fold And there be no cattle in the stalls, Yet I will exult in the Lord, I will rejoice in the God of my salvation. The Lord God is my strength, And He has made my feet like hinds’ feet, And makes me walk on my high places. For the choir director, on my stringed instruments.” (Habakkuk 3:17–19, NASB95).

We could all learn from him.

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